Editorial Style Guide: E

e.g. Means “for example”; do not confuse with i.e., which means “that is.” It is followed by a comma.

Eggheads. Photographs of the Arneson Egghead sculptures on campus require a copyright notice. See the “artworks” heading under the captions entry.

ellipses. See the “ellipses” heading under the punctuation entry.

email. Lowercase e, with no hyphen

emeritus. See the “academic and professional titles” heading under the titles entry or AP Stylebook’s “emeritus” entry.

endowed chairs and professorships. See the lecturers, lectures, lectureships entry and the “academic and professional titles” heading under the titles entry.

eras. See the historical periods entry.

exhibitions. See “exhibitions” under composition titles entry.

ex officio. Do not hyphenate or italicize. Used as an adjective or adverb: She serves ex officio as a member of the UC Davis Foundation; He is an ex officio member of the committee.